Stats Glossary

This article contains information on various statistics that are presented in FastScout 2


Topics:

Standard Stats

Advanced Stats

Four Factors

Color Shading




Standard Stats:


GP

Games Played


GS

Games Started


MIN

Minutes Played


FGM - A

Field Goals Made and Attempted


FG%

Field Goal Percentage


3PM - A

Three Pointers Made and Attempted


3P%

Three Point Percentage


%3P

Percentage of Attempts that are Three-Pointers. For example, if a player takes 10 shots, 6 of which are three-pointers, their %3P would be 60%. An NBA player with a high %3P is Kyle Korver, at 72%.


FTM - A

Free Throws Made and Attempted


FT%

Free Throw Percentage


PTS

Points Scored


OREB

Offensive Rebounds


DREB

Defensive Rebounds


REB

Total Rebounds


AST

Assists


TO

Turnovers


BLK
Blocks


STL

Steals


PF

Personal Fouls



Advanced Stats:


USG%

Usage percentage is the percentage of team possessions used by a specific player when they are in the game. A player "using" a possession means that a player ends a possession with either a shot attempt, free throw attempt, or turnover. An NBA player with a high USG% is Russell Westbrook, at 42%. The formula for usage percentage is 100 * ((FGA + 0.475 * FTA + TOV) * (Tm MP / 5)) / (MP * (Tm FGA + 0.475 * Tm FTA + Tm TOV))


eFG%

This is a field-goal percentage that adds in the extra value of 3-pointers. Perimeter players that shoot a lot of threes often have lower field-goal percentages than post players who shoot closer to the basket, but effective field-goal percentage adjusts for this by giving additional value to the extra point gained from a three-pointer. The formula is (FGM + .5 * 3PM) / FGA


FTRate

For Free-Throws, we use Free-Throw Rate. This is the rate of free-throw attempts per field-goal attempts. Free-throws are an especially efficient use of a possession. Teams score, on average, about 1 point per possession. As long as a player shoots above 50% from the free-throw line, it is likely a team will score more than one point when shooting free-throws. A made free-throw forces the other team to inbound the ball, which allows time for your defense to get set. Additionally, drawing fouls obviously gets an opponent's players into foul trouble. The formula for Free-Throw Rate is FTA / FGA.




Four Factors:


We know that today, many coaches navigate to team websites before games to print out previous Box Scores and Cumulative Statistics from the season. FastAnalytics is a web-based application that allows you to quickly view team and player statistics from across NCAA Division 1, NBA, WNBA and the NBA D-League.


We have included a Four Factors table with our box scores and the cumulative season stats. The Four Factors are four categories of basketball that are especially predictive of a team's success. They include Shooting, Turnovers, Rebounds, and Free-Throws. Each of these categories has a specific stat that describes a team's performance.



For Shooting, we use Effective Field-Goal Percentage. This is a field-goal percentage that adds in the extra value of 3-pointers. Perimeter players that shoot a lot of threes often have lower field-goal percentages than post players who shoot closer to the basket, but effective field-goal percentage adjusts for this by giving additional value to the extra point gained from a three-pointer. The formula is (FGM + .5 * 3PM) / FGA.


For Turnovers, we use Turnover Percentage. This is the percentage of the time that a team turns the ball over on offense. In this case, a lower percentage is better. Turnovers obviously end a team's chance of scoring and also often give the opponent an easy opportunity to score. The formula is Turnovers / Possessions.


A quick note on why we use percentages. Percentages allow us to control for how fast a team plays, which we call Tempo in FastAnalytics. Teams that play fast will have higher numbers of turnovers and rebounds because they have more possessions in a game. A team that has 15 turnovers in 80 possessions actually turns the ball over less often than a team that has 12 turnovers in 60 possessions. In this example, the first team's turnover percentage is 15/80 or 18.7%, while the second team's turnover percentage is 12/60 or 20%.


For Rebounds, we use Offensive and Defensive Rebounding Percentage. This is the percentage of available rebounds that a team gets. Getting rebounds is vital to a team's performance because it either ends a possession or creates a new one. An offensive rebound creates a new possession for a team. Since teams, on average, score around 1 point per possession, having extra possessions adds a lot of value. A defensive rebound ends an opponent's possession, not allowing them any extra opportunities to score. The formula for offense is ORB / (ORB + Opp DRB), while the formula for defense is DRB / (Opp ORB + DRB).


For Free-Throws, we use Free-Throw Rate. This is the rate of free-throw attempts per field-goal attempts. Free-throws are an especially efficient use of a possession. Teams score, on average, about 1 point per possession. As long as a player shoots above 50% from the free-throw line, it is likely a team will score more than one point when shooting free-throws. A made free-throw forces the other team to inbound the ball, which allows time for your defense to get set. Additionally, drawing fouls obviously gets an opponent's players into foul trouble. The formula for Free-Throw Rate is FTA / FGA.



Color Shading:


A great feature of Scout 2.0 is being able to easily view Box Score statistics that vary significantly from a player or team's average throughout the season.


Each color shading represents standard deviations from the player's or team's average:


Light Blue = 1 standard deviation below average

Dark Blue = 2+ standard deviation below average

Light Orange = 1 standard deviation above average

Dark Orange = 2+ standard deviation above average



Hovering your mouse over any of the color-coded statistics will show you the season average that the stat varies from:


This is a great tool to help identify trends or outliers when reviewing previous Box Scores for your opponents or your own team.



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